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$500 bonus cash. ♪ >>> graph time. during the george w. bush administration, government spending went up a lot. this is government expenditures per capita, per american person. it combines federal, and state and local governments, right? as you can see, it start there's when george w. bush took office in 2001, and it wasn't like there was just some individual spike in spending that happened right after 9/11. it was a steady, huge increase over time. so per capita government spending was roughly 12 grand per person when w. came into office. when he left office, it wasn't 12 grand anymore, it was 16 grand in government spending for every man, woman and child in the country. that is a big, steep increase. for comparison sake, if you look at bill clinton, who was in office for the same amount of time, bill clinton also saw a spending rise, but compared to dubbia, he kept spending under control. it really takes off, as you can see, when it goes to bush. since president obama has been in office, he has been better than both of them. he hasn't just held the reins, like clinton did, he has tu
president, and george w. bush was a guy who thought deeply about imuation reform, poverty and trying to craft a middle class agenda for the gop. george w. bush is a figure that many republicans have been running away from. so tell me, do you think republicans were too quick to abandon george w. bush? >> i'm sorry, what? i was tweeting. i'm sorry. [laughter] um, well, yes and no. i think, obviously, politically republicans distanced themselves from george w. bush because it was politic thing to do. numbers don't lie. he became very unpopular. parties tend not to embrace figures and politicians who become unpopular. my view is that a lot of the distress over bush's domestic agenda from which republicans fled beginning really in 2005 had, it was a, it was an ancillary result of the failure to secure victory in iraq early and to have a favorable reckoning -- >> so iraq sank what might have been a successful domestic policy agenda? >> right. well, what i mean is that i think the entire country stopped listening to president bush on what would be efficacious for the country when it lost fa
say it long enough, it must be true. i submit to you that george w. bush, who won two terms as a republican president, he was also told the same thing for 2.5 years. you can win. i would ask people politely, in 1997, who do you like in 2000? george w. bush, that is terrific. why? he can win. why do you think you can win? he is high in the polls. i will say, he did get high in the polls. how did that happen? everybody thinks he can win. plus he raised all that money. he is high in the polls, everybody thinks he can win. it becomes circular. he can win -- the democrats never ask that question. quickly, jimmy carter, barack obama, bill clinton. three important things we should learn. one was, they were all told they can't win. jimmy, how many times as he told he cannot win? and he won. i many times was barack obama told, don't even bother? hillary has got it wrapped up. that again? they were all told you can't win. they all one. two of them won twice. 20 years of democratic president because they defied the nonsense of who can or cannot win. third, they all one with people you
to elbow their way to the front. for george h.w. bush that's a great example. another great example, william f. buckley. he had liberal friends. in fact, he campaigned for liberals that were his friends even though he knew it upset some on the conservative side. for william f. buckley, it wasn't a blood sport. >> to end this block, to counter it just a bit, and i'm sorry but it has the added value of being true, the president does need to reach out.agree. but he has, and it hasn't worked. so when he does it again, the republicans actually need to show up. >> you just quoted henry kissinger. there is hope. >> that's like me going jogging for ten minutes and saying afterwards, you know what i didn't lose 30 pounds. no i'm dead serious. they have stuck their toe in the water. that is it. when you still have democrats, democratic senators that run the senate andrea mitchell complaining that they've never been to camp david, the president doesn't call them they don't go over to the white house, then it's time for him to be more aggressive about this. >> two points quic
of them will not be here today. george w. bush, and george h.w. bush. the 88-year-old just got home from the hospital because of bronchitis and infection. and his son, george w., said he wanted to be with his father. but his dad said, when you leave the stage, stay off the stage. that's liberating. >> president carter, in september, set the record for the longest retirement in presidential history. it had been held by hubert hoover. now, jimmy carter's been ex-president for 32 years. and what he has done with that, as well. you see the crowds crossing pennsylvania avenue. everyone gathering. the president will be coming to the capitol, starting around 10:40. >> we are told, people are given much clearer directions this year about where they go, when they can cross. that security has asked that apps are guiding everybody. people were stuck in a tunnel four years ago, and couldn't get to their destination. >> 2 million people came to the mall. under 1 million this time around. you see the crowd right there. the president and the first lady are inside the white house right now. earlier this
, but the 17th to have to go in all girls. the others include george w. bush, bill clinton, ronald reagan, richard nixon, to eisenhower, fdr, woodrow wilson, william mckinley, ulysses s. grant, abraham lincoln, anger jackson, james monroe, james madison, thomas jefferson, and george washington. down on the national mall where the crowds are gathering, we have a reporter in the middle of everything. >> right from a capital, in the middle of the national mall, three ladies with us and make the journey to this and operation. >> i am gloria, from seattle. >> michelle, new york. >> marion, pennsylvania. >> you decided to meet here. >> we are all three sisters. >> why did you decide to come to washington for the 57 and operation? >> i think we regretted not being here quarter years ago. we decided we would not miss it this time around. >> we never thought about it or we did not think it is possible to come altogether. >> how did this all happened? how did each of you get here? >> i drove up from pennsylvania. >> i flew in. >> gives me an average cost of how much this will come to, the bill to b
. mitt romney, he can win. if he said it won enough, it must be true. george w. bush, who won two terms, as a republican president, i would ask people politely in 1997, who delights in 2000? george w. bush, that is terrific. why? he can win. you are right. he raised all of that money. how did he raise all that money? it becomes circular. he can win, the democrats never asked that question. jimmy carter, bill clinton, barack obama. they were all told, you cannot win. how many told -- how many times was jimmy carter told, you cannot win? how many times was barack obama told you cannot win? they all won. two of them twice. the 01 with people you had never heard of before. we do not have anything like that in the republican party. we throw good money after bad. dole and mccain and romney use the same people. staff infection. it will not matter to do you put in front of them if you have the same people pulling the same strengths. [applause] >> how do we make a compelling argument? from a conservative point of view, how can you even make the compelling argument to republicans? it is not some
they have been there already. it's called george w. bush america. it has two unfunded wars, depression and ongoing effort to divide americans over wage issues. it leads to secure a presidential win in 2016 by changing the rules of the electoral college. now under the old rules the candidate who wins the popular votes gets all of the state's electoral votes. which is how president obama beat mitt romney handily 332- 332-206. but under the new rules presidential candidates would split the electoral college votes based on which congressional districts they won with two additional electoral votes going to the winner of the popular vote. so if those rules had been in effect last year, president obama would have lost to governor romney 262-273. nice thinking. right now those rules are in effect in two states maine and nebraska. but g.o.p. legislation in michigan pennsylvania and virginia are also considering making the change. the g.o.p. also isn't backing down on its effort to restrict access to the ballot box by potential democratic voters wherever it can. so the democratic legislators in
and george w. bush began the second term as president and the minority rights you have in the u.s. senate, that requires more than 60 votes to usually get things done, was very instrumental in making sure that the second term of george w. bush wasn't a runaway freight train. now, what is true and i think progressives are coming from is that president obama's first two years in office, there was an unprecedented number of filibuster. it wasn't being used on big matters but on everything. but with the agreement was able to do last night was on some lower court judges as well as lower court cabinet positions, they're easier to pass as well as to be able to pass some procedural moves. very incremental change, thomas. the white house happy with it. progressives not so much. >> all right. so people that know the movie "mr. smith goes to washington" this is not like that. >> exactly. that was what liberals and progressives wanted the most. if you wanted to actually filibuster, you had to do it on the floor in person as long as it took. that was not part of the refor s s and that left some people
with george w. bush or condoleezza rice, or colin powell would have gone nearly, remotely same zip code as soft as "60 minutes" tid. the new republic had more of an excuse. flagship liberal publication but funny the editor of the new republic, chris hughes, dot-com millionaire. donor that used for obama and says in the letter to readers in same issue with the interview, he says how they will have no partisan bias. they are not going to push a party line, not going to be biased toward a group or party. yet, this thing was basically dictation from the president of the united states. >> bret: mara? >> i think that, you know, chris hughes has to prove that. right out of the gate he did an interview with the president and he is a big donor and employee. it seemed weird. full of conflict. the steve croft interview was interesting when you hear him asking the question, why did you want to do this? almost like a bubble over his head why did i agree to do this? it was kind of tough piece exit interview pat on the head for hillary. he played along from what we can tell. >> bret: exit interviews a
: many people are saying that this president could use george w. bush on the issue of immigration because he is that as a key domestic agenda item on for his second term and he felt pretty good president bush help him on immigration with republicans? pick it'm sure he could is a question of whether he wants to play that role. there are plenty of other surrogates who could play this role, and the most important one is marco rubio, who was not only of hispanic origin, but also younger and can appeal to this whole dreamers movement, and he is right here in washington serving in congress and drafting legislation and working on a bipartisan basis. there is also a large number of democrats and republicans who, while we don't hear about it, are working behind the scenes, like lindsey graham and charles schumer, on putting some kind of legislation out there. certainly bush, he decided to step forward, could play a constructive role. it is not like he is going to let democrats just because he decided to put himself out there on the issue. it would only help in terms of bringing republicans on boar
two living presidents george h.w. bush who was just released from the hospital and is who is now recovering, and george w. bush who sends his regrets. >> so as it happens because of the illness of the elder mr. bush, there will be only democratic presidents in attendance today. very, very unusual circumstance. the headline of the hour, the news broke moments ago by bob schieffer is that the republican leadership at this moment is in the white house having coffee with the president. perhaps a hopeful sign that agreements might come with the new year. >>> here's what's coming up the rest of this inauguration day. at 10:40, the president and mrs. obama leave the white house for the capital. the inaugural ceremonies begin at 11:30 and include the ceremonial swearing-in of vice president biden. then at 11:55, president obama will be sworn in by chief justice john roberts. and at noon, the president will deliver his inaugural address. that will be followed by lunch at the capital. then around 2:30, the president leads a procession back to the white house where he and the first lady wil
here obviously. president george w. bush at 171, we do not have numbers on h.w.bush. what amy noted, the way that the president handled these particular appointments was a bit unprecedented. is it reasonable to suspect that this is not going to be the end of this the white house will not say, you have us, we will change our ways? >> sure, we need to balance what she was saying by suggesting that maybe the senate has been overreaching a little bit. if you go back and read the explanation, the federalist papers, it is the president who is supposed on object the controlling factor who is appointed in his administration. they are not to block the appointments through ideological reasons. >> this federal appeals court says that the senate has the privilege to advise and consent. i used to work for the senate majority leader i remember when the shoe was on the other foot. and senate democrats were blocking it, the federal appeals court said that the white house cannot look at the senate floor and say, we do not see business going on here and we will claim that you are in recess and make a
but no one will dispute the fact that george w. bush was aiming for the bleachers with his second inaugural with what he called his freedom speech which is -- in terms of projecting american force, moral and military around the world in the wake of 9/11 and the doctrine of preemptive military action. >> you knows the reference to lincoln, we talk about being in a divided america now. in many ways we are politically. but you think about lincoln and that inauguration, both of his, it was a different level. >> different level all together. he is involved in the conflict where half a million people would be killed, the end of channeled slavery. a lot is at stake. we're fighting now but not anywhere like that, thank god. >> we're about to see the introduction of the first lady of the united states, michelle obama. as you watched her grow in this role the last four years, what do you think? >> well she has done -- she is a, the most popular person in america just about. she has firmed up the sense of this family as a very responsible family that people can relate to, which was not always going to
. ohio delivered the presidency for george w. bush. how we remember. this might be why reince priebus, reelected as the rnc chair, is so optimistic about the electoral future for the republicans. >> no state is that reliably a blue state. but it's up to all of us to decide if we're willing to fight for these states. it takes work. it's not going to happen overnight. but from what i've seen in wisconsin, we can make it happen. in two years, we all want to hear the words and the headlines republicans everywhere. >> well, this is the electoral map from the 2012 election. president obama won by four points in a large margin in the electoral college. this is what happens under the republicans' everywhere strategy. president obama still wins by four points, but loses the presidency in an electoral landslide. as long as this plan is out there, republicans will continue to downplay it. >> i would not be for it. i don't think there is any sort of national movement. and you have sort of convinced me that in virginia, there may not even be any state movement. it may be an isolated legislator. >>
. how do i expend those losses? no competition. clearing the field. when george w. bush was told that he could win, the very first primary comp petition -- contest emma john mccain beat him in points, he became a better candidate overnight. all of a sudden, somebody beat him. he became a much better candidate overnight and became a two term residents. we should want competition. that person never is ready for prime time. i think some of these governors are terrific. this movement should come up with a job description. if you are going to hire at national review, posted job description. . why are we not doing that? it is not a litmus test. what should your skills be, your belief system. i think we will have to nominate people who are relatable. who have an everyman story. we have that on our side much more than they have that. what is so everyman about john kerry or rockefeller? , because these people i am sure you are aware, voters do not ask, do i like you? they ask, are you like me? are you like me? do we have anything in common? what is our connect tissue: should mark -- connective ti
of the former press secretary of president george w. bush? did you ever get to interviewing that author, the father of scott mcclellan? >> i didn't interview him. all i can say about lyndon johnson's role in the assassination is in all my years of working on lyndon johnson's papers and going for his diaries like everything else, all the people close to him, i never found the slightest hint that he had anything to do with the assassination. yes, sir? >> lbj is well remembered as someone who was very adept at gaining the senate and working with congress as president, difficult things done. how well did he do getting things done with a polarized environment? >> that is a terrific question. it is hard to answer, if part of the answer is the following, when lyndon johnson became majority leader of the senate in 1955 the senate was and has been for decades, let's put it that way, same mess, hard to believe, the same dysfunctional mess and it is today. bills couldn't get past. the power in front of the president wasn't a party, republicans against democrats, half of the democrats in the senate
war draft evaders. and george w bush, dick cheney and mitt romney didn't show up. [ ♪ theme music ♪ ] >> john: good evening, i'm john fugelsang. this is "viewpoint." thank you for spending your martin luther king jr. holiday with us. president obama marked his second inauguration at president with a speech that was less lofty and a lot of more lefty than his first time around. after taking the oath of office from chief justice john roberts mr. obama outlined a wish-list of progressive policies and programs for the next four years and called for collective action to put them in practice. >> obama: now more than ever we must do these things together as one nation and one people. we the people, understand that our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it. we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders of a rising middle class. we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of healthcare and the size of our deficit. but we reject the belief that america must choose between caring for the generation that bui
citizens. >> repter: >> reporter: president george w. bush was outspoken in his support from the beginning. i think we have clear presidential support here, and what we have in our state, our conversation last night with the president, he cheered us on. >> it's important to keep in mind that for this plan to become law, it would have to pass the republican-controlled house of representatives. speaker boehner will allow it to come up with a vote. we want to talk about this. joining us from maryland, the democratic state senator of montgomery county and corey stewart, republican chairman of the prince william county bord of supervisors. chairman stewart, i want to start with you. you have been a longtime voice on the immigration debate, saying mainly that local and state governments have carried the bulk of issues. how do you see this today? is the federal government stepping up in your view? >> the federal government has no credibility with regard to immigration reform and enforcement. why would we believe that washington is going to enforce new immigration law if it's not enforcing the cur
. and his predecessor george w. bush had a 61% polarization rate and the fox news poll shows him polarizing into the second term. >> well, you know what, kelly, it's not all his fault. >> kelly: good points. >> we've had more politicians in washington put politics before policy. having said that, reagan was a great leader, bill clinton was a great leader. reagan cut deals with tip o'neill. bill clinton cut deals with newt gingrich. you have to compromise. obama is a great or atore and motivational speakers and he's he not been a great leader, but takes republicans coming to the table as well. >> kelly: well, why is it, why does this kind of problem exist for the president who wanted to become the unifier in chief and yet, in many ways he's perceived as the divider in chief. well, i think, you have to look at how republicans have treated the president since he's been elected into office and now reelected. now, half of the republican party doesn't believe the president is the citizen of the country-- >> that's not true, that's not true. >> 49% of republicans-- >> and that's the poll, not eve
response. the fifth president should either be bill clinton or george w. bush. i like clinton. he was the first president i voted for. can you also comment on our facebook page and let us know who you think the president should be. that's it for the morning line. back to you. >> still thinking about that one. >>> still ahead, a check of what is new at the box office this weekend. kevin mccarthy tells us if any are worth your money. we'll be right back.  [ woman ] my boyfriend and i were going on vacation, so i used my citi thankyou card to pick up some accessories. a new belt. some nylons. and what girl wouldn't need new shoes? and with all the points i've been earning, i was able to get us a flight to our favorite climbing spot, even on a holiday weekend. ♪ things are definitely... looking up. [ male announcer ] with no blackout dates, you can use your citi thankyou points to travel whenever you want. visit to apply. >>> a dark story about what happens to two fairy tale characters when they grow up and a rolando paulino. y comedy that features
a few comments. jessie coffee suggests bill clinton or george w. bush. and stay with us this morning. coleing up at 7:30, mark lerner and screech will be here live from the nats. >> it is interesting. we were talking about the presidents and any time kevin starts talking about the movies, we start talking about the movies. >> everybody starts talking about their favorites. >> still ahead, this morning as big story continues to be the weather. >> sidewalk and side roads are still a little tricky this morning after what we saw yesterday. the weather could impact your drive home later on today. >>> plus, there are some closings and delays this morning too and we have got the latest list on it is also running at the bottom of your screen so keep an eye out for it. time now is 5:28. >>> welcome back to fox 5 morning news. this is a live look outside over a cold washington, d.c. we had some snow yesterday and this afternoon, we'll get some more snow. it is friday, january 25th and we've got some information for you as well. >> some school closings and delays to tell you about
party and of cuban descent. he will be influential. john mccain campaigned against george w. bush in 2000, a long time advocate of immigration reform is big advocate of this. democrats almost every case on this bipartisan committee as well as in the senate are expected to follow the president's lead whatever he outlines tomorrow many they're on board with that agenda. the big question and stumbling block has been for decades is border security. how do you define it, how do you support it? this includes the use of drones, technology, all kinds of electronic surveillance and et cetera, critics say there is not enough. you need a fence and more troops on the border. how that gets legislated and sorted out we her from the president and house republicans will be influence in the outcome. house republicans want to be very much a part of passing this legislation this time. jamie: i would love to see our troops continue to work down there. that would be so helpful. carl, thanks. jon: for more on the immigration reform plan let's bring if karl rove, former chief visor and deputy chief of s
presence put together by jim baker and george h. w. bush and the success in the engagement of it. but subsequent to that, we have seen a completely different scene. that is what i would describe as three alarmers and two alarmers. we about a dozen fires popping up here in different parts of the world within all of a sudden you have people who don't have the -- a lot of people in congress who don't have the previous reference have basically come to the conclusion that the world has changed and we can't afford nor do we have the public support for global open gaugement. -- engagement. when you talk to people back home and you say why do we give so much foreign aid? it is literally like saying, you know, you need to diet and lose a lot of weight and you get a haircut and solve the problem. the amount of foreign aid and presence now is shrinking to the point where it's relatively insignificant compared to it. but yet the will to support that going forward and even step out and say well we ought to be more engaged here or do more here or these are the functions that are working. it's
for both of george w. bush's inaugurations combined. although inaugurations are explicitly about putting elections behind us, about accepting the results of the election and agreeing mutually that we will proceed with this new government now which we have chosen as a group, it is hard on days like that not to look back, at least a little, to appreciate how different inauguration day would have been had the election gone the other way. particularly for an inauguration that took place on the eve of the 40th anniversary of roe versus wade. >> i hope to appoint justices to the supreme court that will follow the law and the constitution. and it would be my preference that they reverse roe v. wade. >> in my view, the right course for roe v. wade is to have it overturned. >> i would love to have the supreme court say let's send this back to the states rather than having a federal mandate through roe v. wade, let the states again consider this issue state by state. >> my view is that the right next step in the fight to preserve the sanctity of life is to see roe v. wade overturned. >> do i belie
george w. bush. he's currently a senior adviser at the united states institute of peace. welcome to both of you. first, zbigniew brzezinski, your thoughts on john kerry as nominee for secretary of state? >> i think he's an absolutely top-notch choice. very good. experienced, solid, energetic with a broad vision and with a strong focus on trying to stabilize those parts of the world that are especially dangerous. i think he's practical, intelligent, well informed. >> brown: stephen hadley? >> he's in a way spent his whole life preparing for this job and it's good he did because he takes in the a very challenging time and i think he's going to have a lot of challenges before him. i think one of them is to prioritize where he's going to put his time. >> brown: well, you know, he spoke about the economy, getting the economy right first and foremost. he said "more than ever foreign policy is economic policy." did that sound right to you? >> i think that's right and i think this is a man who's grown up, really, in the political military side of foreign policy and national security and i think
is feeling good. >> remember, george w. bush was the same way. he came up and had a little bit more swagger after he was re-elected. i think that's what you get in the first couple of months before you start digging into the muck. >> given the climate in washington and what he has faced many his first term. >> he seems to be enjoying this job in a way he hadn't before. he came into a second term thinking that the fever would break in washington. the sort of tea party revolution that had taken over, and in some ways he seems to be right. if you look at what happened with the fiscal cliff, if you look at some of the filibuster reform. >> debt ceiling. >> the debt ceiling stuff. it seems like this is a city that he gets -- he is more of an insider in washington than he was four years ago. i will say about the denis mcdonough appointment, it's good to finally see a white guy get a top job. it's really -- they've been shut out. >> they gave him a chance. >> thanks god. >> there's a reason why this was held up. the president jokes about saying it's the best kept secret in washington. we've all kn
fixing elections? more than a third of democrats think george w. bush's supporters probably rigged the election in ohio back in 2004 through voter fraud, including a majority of african-americans. about the same number of republicans, 36%, think obama's supporters did the same thing to win last november, although there was no evidence of any cheating or anything, even a machine foul up. think back to 9/11. more than a third of democrats are part of the truther crowd, people who believe president bush knew about the attacks before they happened, as do nearly 60% of african-americans. the difference in the parties is the knowledge base. republicans who know more about the news are actually more likely to believe conspiracy theories fueled by right wing media like fox. dan cassino is a political science professor at fairleigh dickinson university. and radio broadcaster michael smerconish. michael, you brought this to our attention. i want to get you as a generalist like me, what do you think this told you that surprised you, this poll? >> well, it reinforced what i have suspected all
tennet, in the george w. bush days. that is why john brennan didn't get the nomination to run the cia in the first time around. so his confirmation hearings this time around, february 7th, should be very interested. there is controversy there. the other nomination, where there used to be suspense, is former republican senator chuck hagel, i say there used to be suspense, because there were questions about whether there would be fight from the left have dried up. chris coombs, all have met with mr. hagel this week, he assuaged their worries, ditto, charles schumer, of new york, he addressed criticism of his hard-line anti-gay and anti-abortion political past. he addressed that criticism, where they largely neutralized it. ahead of his confirmation hearings on thursday, republicans are making noises about chuck hagel. the only strange remaining might be evidence of any interesting and therefore important resistance to chuck hagel is probably this ad, you might have seen from an unknown group called "use your mandate." >> chuck hagel, he has been nominated to be secretary of defense. and
who spent plenty of time in the minority, they have been in the minority when george w. bush had republican majorities in both houses. they saw the tax cuts go through, they have seen other instances where they're fearful enough that the worm will turn, and they want to be in a position where they can use their minority status for leverage. and if you put that together with the other reality, ezra, which is that all the other 100 senators who have egos like to use holds, sometimes even with their own president, to block action on a nomination. to give them a 2 x 4 across the forehead to gain something that may be entirely extranneous. >> thank you. >> the part of the election that people couldn't just start -- stop talking about. it was beyonce, and that is next. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use. it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 101 (some duplicates have been removed)